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Tune into Dr.Phil Nov. 29th!

Last month I got the opportunity to be on the Dr. Phil show for Rheumatoid Arthritis awareness! It was an awesome once-in-a-lifetime experience and I feel so honored to put a different face to this invisible illness. Rarely do us in the chronic crew get the opportunity to share with the public how Arthritis affects us, so for that reason, I’d LOVE for YOU to share your face with @DrPhil on Twitter/Facebook/Instagram on November 29th with #RedefiningRA!

The segment airs November 29th, so tune in next Wednesday! For local listings, click here.  …SCROLL DOWN FOR VIDEO!13861109-E4AF-4CC7-A264-AEDAF908AF22.JPG

D is for Disabled

So, this is going to be embarrassing… Today I got my first D since 11th grade, second D ever.

In case you didn’t know, I’m in my Junior year of college majoring in Psychology and minoring in Statistics. And.. I love school. Always have. Not really the institution of it, but I do love learning and reading. When my RA came back at 17 after a remission in my teens, my schoolwork became the first casualty in what I like to call, “My RA vengeance.” I’ll never forget hobbling around on crutches, not being able to hold a pencil and vomiting in the trash can at the back of the class after being put on Methotrexate for the first time in my life. I dropped classes, abandoned classes, and the W’s racked up.

After everything I’d done–getting into the School for Advanced Studies (a dual-enrollment program) at 16 and graduating early, I dropped out of college in my second year. Truth be told, I took too long to drop out. I waited until I literally could not walk anymore and even showering became impossible. Looking back, I wish I had accepted my new reality sooner.

Fast forward to 2015, I started feeling better and I immediately enrolled at Miami Dade College. It felt amazing to be back to doing what I love and my grades reflected that. Being in school (and doing well) reminded me of who I used to be–energetic, zealous, and tenacious.

That all vanished the second I saw the D at the top of my test paper. I know I have been feeling really bad lately, but how is it that my grades are always the first to suffer?

I know my pain has been making it extremely difficult for me to focus in class and the fatigue has dwindled my motivation to study, but am I really making the same mistake all over again? I don’t know what to think–do I finish school the best I can or do I drop out now and salvage my 4.00 GPA? My biggest mistake before was not reaching out to the Disability Resource Center at my school as soon as I felt sick. In my defense though, I had no idea what was wrong with me and (naively) thought I’d get better in no time! This time, I learned from my denial. I contacted the DRC and I’ve communicated with my professors, but when they don’t know how to help me and I don’t know how to help myself (beyond asking for a scribe or dictation software), what else is a girl supposed to do? (BTW, the DRC doesn’t offer any help with typing or extensions on deadlines–I asked.)

I was so disappointed with myself and really felt like quitting until… I got these messages. Screen Shot 2017-11-20 at 3.48.45 PM.pngScreen Shot 2017-11-20 at 3.50.59 PM.png

Being a part of a community online and getting to know individuals who truly “get it,” means everything. Encouragement from so many people–friends, family, and my chronic clique–reminds me that even though I stumble, (often and awkwardly) the most important thing in life is that I pick myself back up. 🙂

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