Skip to content

RAConnection

There is something irrefutably amazing about being able to communicate across 
time zones and continents with fighters, survivors – exactly like me.
As you all probably know, right now, there are hundreds of articles expressing that Social Media (or the internet) is replacing our relationships. 

I’ll tell you this, as a 20-something-year-old disabled girl, I beg to differ.

Recently, I wrote a research paper for school discussing this very topic. Being that it was a formal paper, there were a lot of things I wasn’t able to say. 
If you’d let me, I’d like to say those things now:
Having Arthritis is scary.
Just walking into a doctor’s appointment is scary. 
“Is the doctor going to help me?” 
“Is he going to believe my pain is real?”
Being surrounded by patients 3-4x your age that are disfigured, crippled, wheelchair-bound, visibly in pain, thin, and who frankly -no offense- look like they’d be better off in heaven than suffering any longer… is saddening and traumatizing.
“Will I be wishing for death when I’m their age?”
“Will I even reach their age?” 
Again, Arthritis is scary

Even though I still wish I was the only girl in the world with RA, I’m eternally grateful for my #RASisters and my #RADudes.
For me, the Internet is all I have to communicate and connect with people like me and I wouldn’t trade that for anything! 
These men and women, young and old, EXTRA-ordinary people who fight an invisible pain 24 hours a day/7 days a week. Friends, who not only personally know every tear, every pain, every disappointment, but also have the heart to offer comfort and advice to someone else. Friends who are feel like they’ve been run over by a truck, but want to know how you’re doing. Friends who will find a remedy and immediately jump online to share it others.  

Friends, I can’t get over you. And yes, I thank the Internet for that. 
Thanks, for allowing me to make life-long relationships across space and time. 

Absolutely nothing can replace the feeling of relief brought on by a friend 
who reaches out at the exact moment you need it.

Meeting my Rheumy Friends for the first time. 🙂

School is in Session!

Hi Everyone!!
So, today marks one week since I restarted college. For those of you who know me really well, you know it’s been a long time coming. 
I have been dreaming of this day for a while now.
The “short” break Arthritis forced me into has taken…. drum roll please…. 3 years. 
       Can you believe it?
If I didn’t have Arthritis, I’d probably have my PhD by now! All my friends from dual enrollment graduated with Master’s two years ago.
      That was a hard pill to swallow… Even among the giant pills I already take for RA.
The first week hasn’t gone as easy as I thought.
I’ve forgotten the rhythm and I feel a bit lost. 
A bit different from my other classmates. 
I have this fear that even as far as I’ve come, I still won’t be able to keep up.
I feel as old and tattered as the used books I bought over Amazon.
The one thing I do know for sure is that I’m not giving up.
Oddly enough, school is just like Arthritis.
The going might get tough, but “the tough” get going……
And I know, I’m definitely ‘the tough.’

http://giphy.com/embed/TrrecytbGL4kg?html5=true
         #lifestoughgetahelmet

Take a Closer Look at Rheumatoid Arthritis with Vectra DA

This test is unbelievable! For so long, people with RA have had to somehow describe to their doctor everything that they’re feeling. This test has changed that for me. Now, my doctor can actually SEE how active my disease is and better understand what I’m going through. It has brought me so much confidence in our doctor-patient relationship as well as helped keep track of what’s working and what’s not. I’m so grateful for this test! It’s truly been a lifesaver!

2.2.14 is RA Awareness Day!

Since today is Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease awareness day I think we should find out what RA actually is! Alongside me, there are 1.5 million Americans and 300,000 children who fight this life-long battle on a daily basis.
There are many misconceptions about Arthritis
so let’s educate the world and share this with everyone we can to support 
Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Awareness Day!

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Find more resources on living with arthritis by visiting arthritistoday.org
Arthritis Today

MORE ABOUT

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease in which your body’s immune system – which protects your health by attacking foreign substances like bacteria and viruses – mistakenly attacks your joints. The abnormal immune response causes inflammation that can damage joints and organs, such as the heart. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment is the key to preventing joint destruction and organ damage.
People
About 1.5 million people in the United States have rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Nearly three times as many women have the disease as men. In women, RA most commonly begins between ages 30 and 60. In men, it often occurs later in life.
Symptoms
The severity of the disease can vary from person to person. Symptoms can change from day to day. Sudden increases in symptoms and illness are called flares. A flare can last for days or months. Key rheumatoid arthritis symptoms are pain, fatigue and warm, swollen, reddish joints. Long periods of joint stiffness in the morning are common. Inflammation in the small joints of the wrist and hand is typical. If a joint on one side of the body is affected, the same one on the other side is usually affected, too. 
Treatment
There is no cure for RA, but there are a number of medications available to help ease symptomsreduce inflammation, and slow the progression of the disease. No one drug works for everyone but many people find treatments that are very effective. The goal of treatment is remission, a state when inflammation is gone or is very low.  A doctor, likely a rheumatologist — a specialty doctor who treats people with arthritis — should monitor your levels of disease activity, or inflammation, on a regular basis through exams and blood tests that reveal how well treatment is working. The doctor may add or change your medications or adjust the dosage after a few months, if the disease is still active. 
Self-care
Self-management is an important part of rheumatoid arthritis care. Staying physically active is the key to keeping joints flexible. Too little movement can lead to joint stiffness. Strong muscles protect joints. Overall fitness improves health in many ways. Managing your weight, eating a nutritious diet and getting a good balance of rest and activity each day are important, too.  

Normal is BORING

Today someone told me (multiples times…), “You have to think you’re going to get better to get better. Don’t be so negative. You have to stop talking about negative things. Positive things happen to positive people.” 

Most anyone who knows me knows that I am a very positive person. I pride myself in being positive. It wasn’t easy to get here. It was an honest-to-God uphill battle. It took a lot of practice, hard work, and patience. 
To me, being positive means accepting my pain and living life happy with who I am even though I have pain. I don’t try to be normal, because I’m not! I’m special and even though I’m not like everyone else I can be just as happy and fulfilled, if not more than those ‘normal people’! I choose to live my life knowing that God gave me this disease because he knew I could handle it and chose me specifically because He knew I would try my hardest to turn it into a positive. What’s so negative about that??

What I like to say is, “I’m not just LIVING with Arthritis, I’m THRIVING with it.”


%d bloggers like this: