Skip to content

5. Acceptance

If this isn’t crippled, then I don’t know what is…
The scariest part is realizing I’ve already accepted it. I’m not angry. I’m not sad. I’m not even embarrassed anymore.
           This is me. This is my ‘normal.’

My family and friends have accepted it as well. I don’t get the, “So today’s a bad day, huh?” comments anymore when they see me with my boat (aka: walker). They know. Everyday is a bad day. The pain is at a constant ‘9’ and the swelling means my favorite skinny jeans aren’t even an option anymore. People rarely make fun of me anymore. I guess this “invisible illness” is beginning to be visible. The only thing I had left was the ability to drive and now that’s basically gone too. 


I’m done trying to hide my boat or use it only when the pain gets unbearable. Why? Because its constantly unbearable and I’m exhausted
Exhausted of pushing myself beyond the point of no return just to keep this secret. This secret that I can do more than I really can. That I don’t need you to help me. I can’t carry my dirty clothes to the laundry room. I can’t change my own sheets or cut my own meat or style my own hair. I can barely stand up in the shower for more than 5 minutes! I can’t keep all this a secret any longer and I need be honest

So here I am, being honest:

There’s a lot of things I can’t do on my own. 
Your 65 year old grandmother can probably do more things than me, but that’s OK. 
I love being me and even though I am practically crippled, there is one thing I can still depend on being able to do…
I can still laugh and I can still have fun, no matter what happens to me. Even if I never find a treatment that works and I never gain my independence, I know I will always be able to smile and enjoy my life. 

2.2.14 is RA Awareness Day!

Since today is Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease awareness day I think we should find out what RA actually is! Alongside me, there are 1.5 million Americans and 300,000 children who fight this life-long battle on a daily basis.
There are many misconceptions about Arthritis
so let’s educate the world and share this with everyone we can to support 
Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Awareness Day!

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Find more resources on living with arthritis by visiting arthritistoday.org
Arthritis Today

MORE ABOUT

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease in which your body’s immune system – which protects your health by attacking foreign substances like bacteria and viruses – mistakenly attacks your joints. The abnormal immune response causes inflammation that can damage joints and organs, such as the heart. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment is the key to preventing joint destruction and organ damage.
People
About 1.5 million people in the United States have rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Nearly three times as many women have the disease as men. In women, RA most commonly begins between ages 30 and 60. In men, it often occurs later in life.
Symptoms
The severity of the disease can vary from person to person. Symptoms can change from day to day. Sudden increases in symptoms and illness are called flares. A flare can last for days or months. Key rheumatoid arthritis symptoms are pain, fatigue and warm, swollen, reddish joints. Long periods of joint stiffness in the morning are common. Inflammation in the small joints of the wrist and hand is typical. If a joint on one side of the body is affected, the same one on the other side is usually affected, too. 
Treatment
There is no cure for RA, but there are a number of medications available to help ease symptomsreduce inflammation, and slow the progression of the disease. No one drug works for everyone but many people find treatments that are very effective. The goal of treatment is remission, a state when inflammation is gone or is very low.  A doctor, likely a rheumatologist — a specialty doctor who treats people with arthritis — should monitor your levels of disease activity, or inflammation, on a regular basis through exams and blood tests that reveal how well treatment is working. The doctor may add or change your medications or adjust the dosage after a few months, if the disease is still active. 
Self-care
Self-management is an important part of rheumatoid arthritis care. Staying physically active is the key to keeping joints flexible. Too little movement can lead to joint stiffness. Strong muscles protect joints. Overall fitness improves health in many ways. Managing your weight, eating a nutritious diet and getting a good balance of rest and activity each day are important, too.  
%d bloggers like this: